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Craig Matthew Kramer, Psy.D., is a 2016 graduate of the PsyD Program in Clinical Psychology at Antioch University, New England

Dissertation Committee:

  • Roger L. Peterson, Ph.D., ABPP, Committee Chair
  • Gina Pasquale, Psy.D., Committee Member
  • William Slammon, Ph.D., Committee Member

Document Type

Dissertation

Publication Date

2016

Abstract

To date, few studies have explored the lived experiences of parents who stutter. Thus, this qualitative study utilized a 15-question, in-depth semi-structured interview to explore how stuttering impacts various parenting roles, functions, activities, and states. Furthermore, this study elucidates how parents who stutter describe and attach meaning to parenting, as well as how they view parental stuttering in terms of disability status. Participants were 10 parents (6 men and 4 women) who self-identified as having a stuttering disorder. All participants were over 18 years of age and had a child between the ages of 5-18. Data was analyzed using an Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Results of the study revealed the following superordinate themes: (a) stuttering symptoms; (b) parental stuttering and positive parenting emotions; (c) parental stuttering, co-parenting, and avoidant behaviors; (d) parental stuttering and verbal discipline; (e) parental stuttering and stigmatization; (f) fear about children stuttering; (g) parental stuttering as it relates to self-identity and disability; and (h) parental stuttering and coping strategies. Within these superordinate themes, the majority of participants reported that parental stuttering exerted both positive and negative influences on affect, cognition, and behavior. Additionally, participants discussed the varied ways in which stigma (societal and self) affected different parenting practices. Furthermore, the majority of participants did not perceive their stuttering to be a disability, nor did they identify with the disability label; a few participants identified a positive self-identity within the context of parental stuttering. All participants reported using coping strategies to manage their stuttering when parenting. Limitations and future implications are discussed.

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Craig Matthew Kramer

ORCID Scholar ID# 0000-0003-2257-0883

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